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The 2nd International Web Observatory Workshop WOW2014

 

The 2nd International Web Observatory Workshop (WOW2014)

8th April 2014, Seoul, Korea

in conjunction with the 23nd International World Wide Web Conference


Programme - workshop on 8th April, Seoul, Korea (updated 24/03/2014)

09:00 Arrival and welcome Wolfgang Nejdl

09:10 Keynote Professor Dame Wendy Hall The Web Observatory: A Web Science Perspective

09:55 Paper session 1 chair Wolfgang Nejdl
09:55 Ian Brown, Wendy Hall and Lisa Harris, Towards a Taxonomy for Web Observatories

10:25 Poster preview - minute madness

10:30 Coffee break

11:00 Paper session 2, chair Kevin Page
11:00 Matthew Weber, Observing the Web by Understanding the Past: Archival Internet Research
11:30 Mizuki Oka, Yasuhiro Hashimoto and Takashi Ikegami, Fluctuation and Burst Response in Social Media
12:00 Gareth Beeston, Manuel Leon, Caroline Halcrow, Xianni Xiao, Lu Liu, Jinchuan Wang, Jinho Jay Kim and Kunwoo Park,Humour Reactions in Crisis: A Proximal analysis of Chinese posts on Sina Weibo in Reaction to the Salt Panic of March 2011

12:30 Lunch (and poster set up)

14:00 Paper session 3, chair Wolfgang Nejdl
14:00 Robert Simpson, Kevin Page and David De Roure, Zooniverse: Observing the World’s Largest Citizen Science Platform
14:30 Paul Booth,Visualising Data in Web Observatories: A Proposal for Visual Analytics Development & Evaluation
15:00 Marie Joan Kristine Gloria, John S. Erickson, Joanne S. Luciano, Deborah McGuinness and Dominic Difranzo, Legal and Ethical Considerations: Step 1b in Building a Health Web Observatory

15:30 Poster session (and coffee break). Accepted posters:
Reuben Binns, Observation without Surveillance: Web Observatories and Privacy
Besnik Fetahu, Stefan Dietze, and Wolfgang Nejdl, What's all the Data about? - Creating Structured Profiles of Linked Data on the Web
Caroline Halcrow, Jinchuan Wang, Xianni Xiao, Lu Liu, Scaling and geo-locating commonly used humour tags in Weibo
Shuangjie Li, Zhigang Wang and Juanzi Li,
Observation on Heterogeneous Online Wikis of Different Languages

16:00 Paper session 4, chair David De Roure
16:00 Huanbo Luan and Tat-Seng Chua, The Design of a Live Social Observatory System

16:30 Panel: Web Observatory interoperability and standards moderator David De Roure
Panellists: Tat-Seng Chua (National University of Singapore), Wendy Hall (Web Science Trust), Jim Hendler (RPI), Thanassis Tiropanis (University of Southampton)

17:25 Wrap up and close David De Roure


Accepted papers

Gareth Beeston, Manuel Leon, Caroline Halcrow, Xianni Xiao, Lu Liu, Jinchuan Wang, Jinho Jay Kim and Kunwoo Park,Humour Reactions in Crisis: A Proximal analysis of Chinese posts on Sina Weibo in Reaction to the Salt Panic of March 2011

Paul Booth,Visualising Data in Web Observatories: A Proposal for Visual Analytics Development & Evaluation

Ian Brown, Wendy Hall and Lisa Harris, Towards a Taxonomy for Web Observatories

Marie Joan Kristine Gloria, John S. Erickson, Joanne S. Luciano, Deborah McGuinness and Dominic Difranzo, Legal and Ethical Considerations: Step 1b in Building a Health Web Observatory

Huanbo Luan and Tat-Seng Chua, The Design of a Live Social Observatory System

Mizuki Oka, Yasuhiro Hashimoto and Takashi Ikegami, Fluctuation and Burst Response in Social Media

Robert Simpson, Kevin Page and David De Roure, Zooniverse: Observing the World’s Largest Citizen Science Platform

Matthew Weber, Observing the Web by Understanding the Past: Archival Internet Research


Accepted posters

Reuben Binns, Observation without Surveillance: Web Observatories and Privacy
Web observatories offer positive opportunities for researchers and industry to generate value from large scale web data. However, much of this data derived from the activity of individuals, whose privacy could be compromised. The web is already seen by some as a tool for surveillance in the hands of government and industry; the research community has a positive duty to demonstrate a privacy-respecting alternative. Drawing from existing research and best practices in data protection and trust frameworks, this poster proposes a series of measures to enable trustworthy and privacy-respecting infrastructure for the Web Observatory community.

Besnik Fetahu, Stefan Dietze, and Wolfgang Nejdl, What's all the Data about? - Creating Structured Profiles of Linked Data on the Web

The Web consists of both unstructured resources such as Web pages and documents and increasing amounts of (semi-)structured open Web data. Linked (Open) Data in particular has provided large amounts of datasets across the Web, where datasets differ fundamentally with respect to their addressed topics, resource types or the provided quality. To facilitate data reuse and take-up, a Web Observatory has to observe and understand the nature of existing Web datasets and their evolution over time. To address this issue, we propose an approach for creating linked dataset profiles. A profile consists of structured dataset metadata describing topics and their relevance. Profiles are generated through the configuration of techniques for resource sampling from datasets, topic extraction from reference datasets and their ranking based on graphical models. Capturing the evolution of such topic profiles is part of our ongoing work. The Linked Data Observatory provides an explorative way to browse and search through the dataset profiles in the entire Linked Open Data (LOD) Cloud.

Caroline Halcrow, Jinchuan Wang, Xianni Xiao, Lu Liu, Scaling and geo-locating commonly used humour tags in Weibo
A data set of 120,093 tweets was mined from Sina Weibo. It is stored in the Web Observatory at Southampton University. The topic focus of the dataset was on the ‘salt panic’ that occurred in China in March 2011, triggered by the Japanese nuclear power plant disaster at Fukushima. The data set was tested for the occurrence of 10 commonly used humour tags, chosen by researchers. The humour tags were then scaled by researchers according to the seriousness of humour intention. The relative occurrence of humour types was mapped by province. The two most popular ‘serious’ humour indicators had a frequency of 15,656 compared with the ‘silly’ total of 10,811. This approximate 3:2 ratio would seem to indicate that expressing ‘serious’ humour is more popular with Sina Weibo in a  ‘salt panic’ context than ‘silly’ humour.  We created a map that demonstrated the range of humour types in provinces in China for the period of the salt panic in 2011. The relative proportions of silly/serious humour by region did not contrast significantly. The Web Observatory at Southampton intends to offer a range of analytical tools: scaling and geo-locating commonly used humour tags internationally could provide effective insights into real world events and situations.

Shuangjie Li, Zhigang Wang and Juanzi Li, Observation on Heterogeneous Online Wikis of Different Languages
Online wikis have been the most widely used knowledge systems on the web. Wikipedia is the foundation of building many knowledge graphs. There have been many large-scale high quality wikis in other languages such as Baidu Baike and Hudong Baike in Chinese, both of which have over 3 million Chinese articles. It is necessary to observe knowledge distribution on Wikipedia and other non-English wikis, which could help maximize the knowledge use and sharing in different languages. This poster presents an method for observing heterogeneous online wikis of different languages. We utilize analytical methods and visualization tools to compare knowledge representation and distribution on four large scale English and Chinese wikis, to obtain four main findings revealing knowledge structure of these online wikis as well as indicate future challenges on global knowledge sharing.


Call for Late Breaking Posters - closed

We are pleased to announce the workshop will include a poster session for dissemination of late breaking work! Posters will be displayed to delegates in a session during the afternoon of the workshop (we're awaiting confirmation from the organizers but assume up to A1 posters please). Accepted posters will be listed on the workshop website along with a short abstract should the author desire (however posters will not be included in the workshop proceedings nor in the ACM DL). To participate in this session please email a title and short abstract describing your work, that conforms to the workshop topic list (below), to wow2014@easychair.org by 18th March 2014. Accepted posters will be notified by 20th March 2014; we will endeavour to  promptly accept early submissions made in advance of the deadline.

Call for Papers - closed

The 2nd International Web Observatory Workshop (WOW2014)

8th April 2014, Seoul, Korea

in conjunction with the 23nd International World Wide Web Conference


N.B. Extended deadline (to 14th January 2014) and revised paper lengths below!

Building on a successful inaugural workshop at the WWW conference last year, WOW2014 provides a focus for the emerging Web Observatory community to share tools, methods, results and experience in the development and deployment of Web Observatories - and to set the agenda for future work in the field.


BACKGROUND

The Web operates at a very large scale and is dominated by emergent phenomena with radical innovations coming from and driven by its users and in time scales that are faster than those exhibited by earlier computer-based systems. We are just beginning to understand how to conduct scientific research on the huge and constantly changing socio-technical system formed by the web and all the people and agents that use it. There are significant challenges in deploying methodologies, datasets, and analytic and visualisation tools, which are fundamental elements of Web Observatories. Scientific method begins with instrumentation and measurement to describe and characterize what is actually happening. Only then can we begin to develop theories and abstractions that enable better design of future evolutions of the systems and quantitative predictions of their behaviour.

 

 

 

IMPORTANT DATES

Workshop paper deadlines: 14th January 2014 (23:59 UTC-11)

 

Workshop paper notifications: 4th February 2014

 

Camera ready deadline: 11th February 2014

 

 

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES

Numerous research labs around the world are building Web Observatories and conducting studies within them, many highly advanced, but typically developed in isolation. The objectives of the workshop are therefore:

  • A forum for reporting, presenting, and evaluating this work and disseminating new approaches to advance the discipline;

  • An opportunity to explore how Web Observatories might in the future interoperate - be that through the exchange of data, metadata, remote access, algorithms, or results;

  • A venue for critically and constructively evaluating and verifying the operation of Web Observatories and the results that flow from them;

  • Continuation of a workshop series for the Web Observatory research community, setting the agenda for research in the field.

 

 

TOPICS

Topics of interest for the workshop include but are not limited to:

  • What is required of an Observatory so it can be used for empirical research of Web associated phenomena? What is the taxonomy of Web Observatories?

  • What software and services are required to build a Web Observatory?

  • How can we analyse and visualise the vast quantity of data captured by Web Observatories? Can we construct computational models for these systems?

  • How can we use the Web as a tool to study real world events and situations?

  • What kinds of temporal models and methods do we need to access and explore the diachronic Web?

  • Which methods of semantic enrichment are needed to allow ease exploration of Web Observatory data sets and corpora?

  • Can observed patterns and trends of existing communities be applied to aid the formation and evolution of new, more effective and collaborative, shared-interest groups?

  • How can I use observatory tools to explore emerging communities / activities on the Web and to understand the evolution of the Web?

  • Can non-consumptive methods play a role in opening Web Observatories to researchers?

  • How can Web Observatories share or exchange datasets, tooling, and methods?

  • What are the ethical, legal, and commercial implications of Web Observatories as a research resource? How might these be addressed?

  • How do I know the data from a Web Observatory is correct? What methods are required for validation and corroboration?


We invite full papers (6 pages) or position papers (up to 3 pages).

Please produce your paper using the ACM template and submit to WOW2014 on EasyChair by 14th January 2014. Accepted papers will be published in the ACM Digital Library.


All submitted papers must:

  • be written in English;

  • contain author names, affiliations, and email addresses;

  • be formatted according to the ACM SIG Proceedings template with a font size no smaller than 9pt;

  • be in PDF (make sure that the PDF can be viewed on any platform), and formatted for US Letter size;

  • occupy no more than six pages, including the abstract, references, and appendices.

 

It is the authors’ responsibility to ensure that their submissions adhere strictly to the required format. Submissions that do not comply with the above guidelines may be rejected without review.


Any paper published by the ACM, IEEE, etc. which can be properly cited constitutes research which must be considered in judging the novelty of a WWW submission, whether the published paper was in a conference, journal, or workshop. Therefore, any paper previously published as part of a WWW workshop must be referenced and suitably extended with new content to qualify as a new submission to the Research Track at the WWW conference.

ACM template: http://www.acm.org/sigs/publications/proceedings-templates

Submissions: https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=wow2014


WORKSHOP ORGANISATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact: wow2014@easychair.org

 

General Chair

 

Kevin Page, University of Oxford, UK

 

Programme Chairs

David De Roure, University of Oxford, UK

Wolfgang Nejdl,  L3S and Leibniz Universität Hannover, Germany

 

Proceedings chair

Thanassis Tiropanis, University of Southampton

 

Advisers

Tat-Seng Chua, National University of Singapore

Noshir Contractor, Northwestern University

Wendy Hall, University of Southampton

 

Programme Committee

Paulo Boldi, Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy

Stefan Dietze, L3S Research Center, Germany

Tobias Preis, University of Warwick, UK

Rob Proctor, University of Warwick, UK

Guus Schreiber, VU University Amsterdam, Netherlands

Robert Simpson, University of Oxford, UK

Arfon Smith, Chief Scientist, GitHub

Steffen Staab, University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany

Ramine Tinati, University of Southampton, UK

Phil Tetlow, IBM, UK

Thanassis Tiropanis, University of Southampton, UK

Evelyne Viegas, Microsoft Research

Ingmar Weber, QCRI, QA, Germany

Matthew Weber, Rutgers University, US

Matthew Williams, University of Cardiff, UK

About the workshop

The second International Web Observatory Workshop (WOW2014) is being held on 8th April 2014 in conjunction with the 23nd International World Wide Web Conference in Seoul, Korea, 7th-11th, April 2014.